Thursday, April 2, 2020

B is for the Black rhino (Folktales of Endangered Species)

Welcome to the 2020 A to Z blogging challenge! This year my theme is Folktales of Endangered Species. I am researching cool traditional stories about rare, fascinating animals - to raise awareness of what we might lose if we don't get our collective shit together. Enjoy!


Species: Black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis)

Status: Critically endangered (some subspecies have already been declared extinct)

Why the rhino scatters its dung
Ndebele folktale

Story says that once upon a time Elephant and Rhino got into a big fight (in one Tonga folktale it was because they had a contest over who can make a larger pile of poop). Rhino was seriously injured in the fight, his hide torn in many places. He limped over to Porcupine, asking to borrow one of her quills to sew up his hide. Porcupine agreed to lend a quill, but only after making Rhino promise to return it after use. (Porcupine needs her quills to defend herself). Rhino, however, got tired from all the sewing, took a nap, and forgot about the quill.
When Porcupine came to take back her quill, Rhino realized it was lost. He figured he must have swallowed it in his sleep. So, ever since then, he has been digging around in his own piles of dung, hoping to find the lost quill and return it.

(Male black rhinos do stomp around in and scatter their dung; this is how they mark their territory.)

Sources: Read about this story here, here, or here. There are also other tales about the rhino you can find here, here, or here. There are some other legends about rhinos in hunting memoirs, namely this one and this one.

How can I help?

Check out black rhino conservation efforts by the WWF or the International Rhino Foundation.

Have you ever lent something to someone and never got it back?
Would you be brave enough to ask a rhino to return it?

25 comments:

  1. I hope they will continue spreading their dung for many years to come.

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  2. I have lent things on several occasions and not got them back - mostly books or DVDs 😂 - so much so that these days I have stickers to add to such things. I figure a lot of it is people forget who they borrowed something form!
    At least the rhino is trying to find what was lost.
    Tasha 💖
    Virginia's Parlour - The Manor (Adult concepts - nothing explicit in posts)
    Tasha's Thinkings - Vampire Drabbles

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  3. There are books I've lent out and haven't got back - been quite a while :)

    It's beyond sad that these magnificent animals have such a precarious existence.

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  4. Loved your Rhino tale. Now I have some new story to tell my toddler...who keeps asking for new stories. Thanks. Look fwd to your C prompt..

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  5. Interesting tale on the animal's habit and behavior. I shall remember for some days.

    BMW - Industrial Engineering Activities and Jobs

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  6. Beautiful animals! I love the fact that you add to your posts "How can I help?". So many endangered species...
    A to Z Challenge

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  7. Cute story! First time here and enjoyed reading this tale.
    http://shimmeringsunshine.blogspot.com

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  8. Oh my goodness. I don't knwo why, I find this story sweet. LOL!

    @JazzFeathers
    The Old Shelter - Living the Twenties

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  9. And here I thought the story was going in a different direction... LOL. Hopefully idiots will stop hunting all rhinos for their horns.

    An A-Z of Faerie: Brownies

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  10. I love the folk lore! This has always been my son's favorite animal! Thank you! Have a wonderful day!

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  11. I like these sorta simplistic tales from the lore compared to the sinister ones. This was a nice tale, Zalka.

    B for Brahmarakshasa

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  12. Hey, I loved your story. That is tempting me to comeback.

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  13. Another interesting tale. My son is enjoying them a lot. And I almost have to ask for my things back from a lot of people I know.

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  14. Who knew a folktale about dung could be so interesting? I do like the idea of a conscientious rhino. I’m not sure what porcupines in Tonga are like, but I was once given a quill from an African porcupine and it was incredibly large – much larger than the species from here in the U.S. It would definitely make the grade as an implement to stitch up tough rhino hide.
    I've had books borrowed and never returned, and once I found a book I had long ago borrowed. I was horrified, but was able to return it to the owner and we had a good laugh about it.

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  15. The rhino seems like a slightly dim but very good-hearted bloke. An elderly woman at the end of our street lent my children a book and then got moved into a nursing home before I returned it. I had no contact info for her and no way of reaching out. I still have that book, and it still weighs on my conscience, even though I'm quite sure she doesn't want it now!

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  16. I love rhinos, particularly because of the joke "Unicorns do exist. They're just fat, grey, and called rhinos." I've probably lent writing instruments and not gotten them back.

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  18. Definitely the kind of story I'd like...

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  19. I am enjoying your stories and fun facts! Cheers see you tomorrow!

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  20. Another wonderful post, on another critical topic. Love how your mind works. I know that it is very time consuming to write posts with such care, including links to resources. Keep up the great work! https://atozwriting.blogspot.com/
    https://atozwriting.blogspot.com/

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  21. What a fun story! You do have to wonder who observed a rhino doing this many centuries ago and thought, “There’s a story behind this...”

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  22. Oh, you also have a nature theme for A to Z! This is a wonderful idea to encourage people to appreciate these animals. Thank you!
    Nutmeg

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  23. What a sweet tale. I love it! We've black rhinos in our local zoo, and they are very active in their conservation.

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